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The Serbs in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, and Kosovo

Soeren Keil

Abstract


Extract

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Abstract

When Yugoslavia dissolved in the 1990s, many Serbs found themselves in new states in which they were not the majority population. They often rejected their inclusion in these states, first through political boycotts and then through violence and secession. This paper will look at the integration of the Serb community in the new states of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, and Kosovo. The aim is to achieve a clearer picture of the different strategies of state-building and group integration in the post-Yugoslav states. The integration of Serbs in these states took place in a number of ways: in Bosnia and Herzegovina they were recognised as one of three constituent peoples (in 1995), while Croatia awarded Serbs the status of a national minority. In Kosovo (after 2008), Serbs have also been recognised as a constituent element of the state and protected by legal equality. Applying the framework of the “quadratic nexus”, this paper will look at the interplay of new states, the Serb community, Serbia, and international actors in order to assess the current state of Serb integration in these states.

Keywords: Serbs, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, minority rights, autonomy, international actors

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Bibliography: Keil, Soeren: The Serbs in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, and Kosovo, ERIS, 2-3-2017, pp. 39-58. https://doi.org/10.3224/eris.v4i2-3.03


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